Nationalism and Globalism – further reflections

In my recent article “Nationalism and Globalism – which does God say is better?”, while I personally concluded Nationalism is better than Globalism, I was reticent to say what I  think God says is better. Even so, two respected friends noted a possible quantum leap between my own theological reflections and my own political pontifications. While I recognize the danger of offering a political view and prefacing it with words like “the Bible clearly says”, I also believe Christians should think theologically (sadly too few do) and while it is true those who do often come to different political conclusions e.g. left or right wing, it should inform our politics. Yet based upon my own theological deliberations, observations, perspectives and world view, I favour nationalism, or to be more precise national identity over a global one.

nationalism

It is easy to do a four cell grid with two rows: nationalism and globalism and two columns: advantages and disadvantages and having populated each cell weigh the findings and come to view. In a way, that is what I did. While I disliked the racism and xenophobia exhibited by some nationalists as well as an insular mindset, I disliked the lack of accountability, a hidden agenda by a powerful elite to subject the masses using mass migration and disrespect of national culture often seen among globalists. I recognize authoritarianism, and an absence of the fear of God can be seen among nationalists and globalists alike. I am also sad that the paradigm we live in, which is as a result of globalization (rather than globalism), favours giant corporations whose motive is profit, who contribute too little regarding taxes and the national good. Ironically, while socialism is gaining popularity, I do not see it benefitting the very poor. I also recognize many issues (I am not fully decided on climate change) require international cooperation. I am mindful nations are often a mish mash of culturally different tribes and a a mongrelisation thereof, and national identity is not always clear cut.  An important part of the gospel I preach is breaking down of barriers between peoples; the command to love our (foreign etc.) neighbour is required whatever system we adopt.

While I believe the fight for dominance by either nationalism and globalism is often at the heart of the culture wars that profoundly affects us all, there is a more fundamental dimension, and that is a spiritual one. The war that matters is the one between light and darkness and God and the Devil, and the truth is people who favour nationalism and globalism can be found on both sides. When I became active in trying to figure out what was really going on in the world some five years ago, I little realized that nationalism and globalism was going to be a big deal and probably if anything was coming round to the idea that globalism was best. But all that changed with Brexit, President Trump and the coming to power of an assortment of nationalistic, popularist movements across the world. I soon found myself bucking the trend by sympathizing (albeit with reservations) with all of these, and at the same time received flak as a result. One thing that astounded me was how easily we had become brainwashed into accepting the status quo.

But the battle continues to rage and we see the evidence every day. Yesterday, I made two posts on my Facebook page that revealed my globalist aversion. The first was a meme containing words from President Putin saying if any one comes to Russia they should obey Russian law and accept Russian ways and if they are not prepared to do so then they are not welcome. The second was a clip from a speech by an EU MEP that was chiding members of the EU Parliament for not giving over more of their countries  powers and sovereignty to the unelected EU bureaucracy. Admittedly, it was a little provocative on my part, especially given Putin’s suppression of minority rights, but both shares reflected how I felt. As an example, the UK along with much of Europe is facing the prospect of more immigration, typically by Muslims. That in itself is not the issue, but the evidence that all too often these new immigrants have no desire to do the sort things Putin suggests and if the afore-mentioned EU MEP has his way we will have little say in the matter anyway, leads me to want to dig my heels in on the matter of restoring national sovereignty and identity that is in danger of slipping away.

I recognize that my own views on eschatology leads me to believe that the move toward globalism is something to be expected in these “last days” and is to be seen in a negative light, e.g. merging machine and people, like microchipping them so the “State” can monitor what we do and is the means for buying and selling, now being seen. While I may be a minority, I remain unrepentant in my views that a hard Brexit is better for the UK, Donald Trump is overall good for America and the World and, while I too recoil at the image conjured up by “Far Right”, I favour the popularist alternatives to the likes of Merkel and Macron. But at least I can watch and pray. How it will all pan out is anyone’s guess. I may not know but I know someone who does. As the old gospel song goes: “He has the whole world in His hands”. Rather than trust the likes of Trump and Putin or a range of alternatives, we should trust Him and resolve to seek His Kingdom and His righteousness, concerning which His Kingdom is far better than the man made ideologies: nationalism and globalism.

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One thought on “Nationalism and Globalism – further reflections

  1. paul fox says:

    “As an example, the UK along with much of Europe is facing the prospect of more immigration, typically by Muslims. That in itself is not the issue, but the evidence that all too often these new immigrants have no desire to do the sort things Putin suggests and if the afore-mentioned EU MEP has his way we will have little say in the matter anyway, ”
    If you change the word Jews, for Muslims, and remember the 1930s, I think this is antisemitic.

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